…Rosebud

First, I must say that Orson Welles is an incredible actor. I really enjoyed him through out the movie and I favored him onset more than any of the other actors, no offense. I also think he did a wonderful directing and collaborating with Mankiewicz on the screenplay. I didn’t know much about him or really took in any of this in consideration when I watched the movie passively before. I found the news reel in the beginning a little long and I kind of had a lapse in concentration, but it did bring me up to speed about who Kane was and how he was received by the public and some other things that the storyline in the movie left out. The scene with the journalist right after the news reel reminded me of “Good Night and Good Luck” starring George Clooney and Grant Heslov. That movie was done in black and white and almost had the exact scene of the reporters discussion after watching a news reel. The storyline was interesting. It kinda irked me that I never saw Thomas’ face throughout the movie but it was a compelling drive to find out what “rosebud” meant. Kane was such an iconic figure and understood how that could be so important. It was enough for the plot. Rosebud being symbolic of his hometown and his days as a child and his family was revealed to us but not to the characters. They were unable to receive that revelation of this powerful man and it gave us the humanity that they weren’t ever able to get. Visually, this movie could rival some and even better some of the films that come out today. Each shot could have been a photograph in an art gallery. They were really crisp and clear, which was due to the deep focus. It played a major part in keep the overall view of movie as good as it was. The contrasts of dark and light really showed the idea of “American Baroque”. Characters in speech had their faces shadowed while others were lit. Even Kane’s palace was designed in real grandeur and extremely over the top. The camera angles were interesting, almost an entire scene was shot from the ground. Some great innovative things were happening in the movie.

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1 Comment

  1.   Amy Herzog Said:

    on October 13, 2010 at 12:00 pm

    Great observations– I agree that the compositions have an overpowering crispness. A few other people observed that they looked like paintings or photographs, too, which is really interesting– there’s an element of stillness at work, even though they are “moving pictures.” I wonder if this has anything to do with the fact that what we are watching are a series of flashbacks or memories, rather than life unfolding in real time.

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